Tag Archives: immigrant visa

Section 201(b)(2)(A)(i) Allows Certain Widows or Widowers of U.S. Citizens to Become Permanent Residents Even When the Citizen Has Died

A U.S. citizen may file a Form I-130 immigrant petition for his or her spouse in the immediate relatives category. If the citizen dies, the widow(er) may still seek permanent residence in the United States under section 201(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Immigration & Nationality Act, when certain conditions are met.

Who Qualifies for Widow(er) Benefits Under INA 201(b)(2)(A)(i)?

U.S. immigration statute permits widow(er)s of U.S. citizens to be classified as immediate relatives and continue the Immigrant Visa or Adjustment to Permanent Resident Status application process if they:

  • Were legally married to a U.S. citizen and not divorced or legally separated from the U.S. citizen at the time of death
  • File a Form I-360 self-petition within two years of the U.S. citizen spouse’s death or have a pending or approved Form I-130 filed by the U.S. citizen spouse prior to death, which will be automatically converted to a Form I-360 petition
  • Show they entered into the marriage in good faith and not solely for immigration benefits
  • Are admissible to the United States
  • Are not remarried before they receive the green card or immigrant visa (NOTE: If there is a remarriage, the applicant may still be able able to pursue section 204(l) relief if he or she was residing in the United States when the petitioner died and continues to reside in the United States).

How to Apply for Widow(er) Benefits

If there is a pending or approved Form I-130 petition, the widow(er) must notify USCIS of the U.S. citizen’s death. The agency will then automatically convert the I-130 to an I-360 self-petition. If there is no pending or approved I-130 at the time of death, the widow(er) must submit the Form I-360 self-petition to USCIS within two years of the U.S. citizen’s death.

Widow(er)s in the United States may file a Form I-485, application to adjustment to permanent resident status, either at the same time the I-360 is filed or after the I-360 is filed, whether it is pending or approved. If an I-485 application was already submitted based on a pending or approved I-130 filed by the deceased spouse, there is no need to file a new one.

A widow(er) who is living abroad may go through the I-360 approval or I-130/I-360 conversion process to apply for an immigrant visa at the U.S. Consulate overseas.

Admissibility Requirement

A Form I-864, Affidavit of Support, is not required for widow(er)s to establish they will not become a public charge under INA § 212(a)(4). A Form I-864W, Request for Exemption for Intended Immigrant’s Affidavit of Support, should be filed with the Immigrant Visa request or Adjustment of Status application.

Widow(ers) are not exempt from the 3/10 year bars to re-entry under INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i) if they accrue more than 180 days of unlawful presence in the U.S. and depart for consular processing of the immigrant visa. The waiver for unlawful presence requires a U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse or parent, which many widow(ers) do not have. Whenever possible, widow(er)s should apply for Adjustment of Status within the U.S. and avoid triggering the 3/10 year bar.

If there are no significant negative factors, and a previously filed I-130 has been converted and approved as an I-360, USCIS will normally exercise discretion favorably in a Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission into the United States After Deportation or Removal, of a widow(er) who is inadmissible due a prior removal order.

Children of Widow(er) of U.S. Citizen

Unmarried children under the age of 21 may be included in the immigrant petition as derivative beneficiaries. As “immediate relatives,” derivative children qualify for benefits under the Child Status Protection Act (CSPA), which “freezes” their ages as of the filing date of the Form I-130 or Form I-360, whichever is applicable. CSPA protects them from aging out if they turn age 21 prior to their being granted a green card or immigrant visa. Still, they must meet any other eligibility criteria or filing requirements. 

Consult a Qualified U.S. Immigration Attorney

A qualified U.S. immigration attorney can help with verifying your eligibility for widow(er) benefits and submitting a request for I-130 to I-360 conversion or filing a properly documented I-360 self-petition. It’s also important to seek counsel in the Adjustment of Status application within the United States or in the Immigrant Visa request at the U.S. Consulate abroad.

For information on other possible remedies for surviving relatives, read our related articles:

Humanitarian Reinstatement Allows Certain Principal Beneficiaries to Become Permanent Residents Even When Petitioner Has Died

Section 204(l) Allows Certain Surviving Relatives to Become Permanent Residents Even When Petitioner or Principal Beneficiary Has Died

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This article provides general information only. It is based on law, regulations and policy that are subject to change. Do not consider it as legal advice for any individual case or situation. Each case is different and case examples do not constitute a prediction or guarantee of success or failure in any other case. The sharing or receipt of this information does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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Grant of Motion to Vacate INA 212(a)(6)(C)(i) (Misrepresentation) Charge+ Issuance of Immigrant Visas = A True Success Story

The U.S. Consulate granted immigrant visas to the father and mother of an adult U.S. citizen after previously denying them — one year earlier — under INA 212(a)(6)(C)(i) willful misrepresentation of material facts to gain U.S. immigration benefits).

Upon receiving our two Motions to Reconsider and Rescind Inadmissibility Determination, the Consulate responded within 10 days, stating it reviewed our requests and removed the permanent bar under INA 212(a)(6)(C)(i) in both cases. The Consulate instructed our clients to appear for a second interview after submitting updated visa application forms and required documents. Approximately six weeks later, they attended their second interview and were granted their immigrant visas to enter the United States as permanent residents.

At the first interview, the Consulate denied the immigrant visas because the applicants had  overstayed their authorized periods in the United States as B1/B2 visitors for many years, but apparently did not disclose this when they applied for new visitor visas.

The section 212(a)(6)(C)(i) bar could not be excused with a Form I-601/INA 212(i) waiver of inadmissibility because they had no qualifying relative  (i.e. U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse or parent) who would suffer extreme hardship if they were not admitted to the United States. A U.S. citizen son does not count as a qualifying relative for immigrant waiver purposes.

Before seeking the immigrant visas based on their U.S. citizen son’s immigrant petition, our clients were informed about the section 212(a)(6)(C)(i) bar when they sought new B1/B2 visitor visas 10 years earlier. At that time, they did not challenge the inadmissibility finding and instead received 212(d)(3) nonimmigrant waivers to be granted visitor visas.

The 212(d)(3) nonimmigrant waiver, however, has less stringent eligibility requirements than the Form I-601/INA 212(i) waiver. By the time the clients retained me to represent them in challenging the section 212(a)(6)(C)(i) bar, almost one year had passed since they attended their first immigrant visa interview.

U.S. federal regulations give them one year from the date of the immigrant visa refusal to file a Motion to Reconsider with new evidence or legal arguments. Responding quickly and effectively, I counseled the clients in preparing their declarations (written testimonies) and gathering documentary evidence showing their overstay occurred before April 1, 1997 and they departed the United States in May 1996.

In the Motion to Reconsider, I acknowledged the applicants might have stated “no” to the  question on whether they had violated the terms of a U.S. visa or been unlawfully present in the United States, when they should have said “yes.”

The father explained that he had used a professional broker service, paid for by his employer, to help fill out the visa application and that if a misrepresentation had occurred, it was not willful. The mother denied stating “no” to the overstay, but had no copies of the visa applications she had submitted.

In any event, I argued that to invoke the section 212(a)(6)(C)(i) bar, the Consulate must not only find that willful misrepresentation occurred, but also that the information at issue was material to the applicant’s admissibility. I pointed out that both visa applicants departed the United States in May 1996 following their long overstay as visitors. The departure date was critical.

The U.S. Congress did not enact the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act until September 30, 1996, when the 3/10 year unlawful presence bar was introduced. Any unlawful presence that was accrued prior to April 1, 1997, when the law went into effect, does not count for purposes of the 3/10 year bar under INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i).

Therefore, when the clients applied for new visitor visas in the early 2000’s, they had not accrued any unlawful presence that made them inadmissible to the United States or ineligible for a visitor visa under INA 212. If there was any failure to disclose an overstay on the visitor visa applications, it did not cut off a relevant line of inquiry regarding their admissibility or visa eligibility.

The clients were fortunate to have the section 212(a)(6)(C)(i) bar lifted upon Motion to Reconsider, particularly because they had no qualifying relative for Form I-601/INA 212(i) purposes. While they could have continued to apply for B1/B2 visitor visas with 212(d)(3) nonimmigrant waivers for temporary trips, their true desire was to live permanently in the United States with their U.S. citizen son. Having permanent resident status further allows them to file immigrant petitions for their two younger children (under age 21), who were born overseas and need to join them in the United States.

Upon receiving the good news that the section 212(a)(6)(C)(i) bar had been removed, the applicants sent me a thank-you email stating, “We are so happy and thrilled and would not be celebrating today if it wasn’t for your talent and expertise. We will always be grateful to you for this outcome. Even in our best estimates, we could never expect a response in such a short time.”

Helping my clients obtain their immigrant visas within two months of filing the Motion to Reconsider and Rescind the section 212(a)(6)(C)(i) bar is a true success story.

Cheers,

Dyan Williams

Founder & Principal Attorney
Dyan Williams Law PLLC
(612) 225-9900
dw@dyanwilliamslaw.com

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This article provides general information only. It is based on law, regulations and policy that are subject to change. Do not consider it as legal advice for any individual case or situation. Each case is different and case examples do not constitute a prediction or guarantee of success or failure in any other case. The sharing or receipt of this information does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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Approval of Form I-212 + Grant of Immigrant Visa= A True Success Story

A U.S. citizen and his permanent resident sister consulted me about their mother’s immigrant visa case, after the U.S. Consulate found her inadmissible under INA 212(a)(9)(C)(i)(I), i.e. illegal reentry following accrual of more than one year of unlawful presence in the United States.  With my counsel, their mother (my client) filed a Form I-212, Application for Permission to Reapply for Admission Into the United States, which the USCIS Field Office in Salt Lake City, Utah approved on February 17, 2017.

The I-212 approval led the U.S. Consulate to schedule the mother for a follow-up interview and issue the immigrant visa. This was her second immigrant visa application based on an approved I-130 immigrant petition her U.S. citizen son filed for her.

Ten years ago, the U.S. Consulate denied her first immigrant visa application upon finding her inadmissible under INA 212(a)(9)(B)(i)(II), i.e. accrual of unlawful presence of one year or more in the United States prior to departing the country. Because she had no qualifying relative (U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse or parent) to be eligible for the Form I-601 [INA § 212 (a)(9)(B)(v)] unlawful presence waiver, she had to wait 10 years for that bar to expire. After waiting a decade to file her second immigrant visa application, she was shocked to hear she was still permanently barred under INA 212(a)(9)(C)(i)(I).

The mother’s description of her re-entry into the United States — following accrual of unlawful presence of more than one year — indicated she was “waved through” at a U.S. border checkpoint, even though she lacked proper travel documents. In general, this means the person entered the United States as a passenger in a car after an immigration officer waved the car through the port of entry.

I counseled the family on two different paths the mother could take to obtain the immigrant visa: (a) file a motion to reconsider with the U.S. Consulate, requesting it find that the wave through counted as a lawful admission and was not an illegal entry to trigger the permanent bar under INA 212(a)(9)(C)(i)(I); OR (b) file a Form I-212 application to be excused from the permanent bar.

Because the mother lacked objective evidence of a wave through, the family chose to file a Form I-212 application with USCIS instead of a motion to reconsider with the U.S. Consulate.

The applicant must be outside the U.S. for 10 years before she may file a Form I-212 to be excused from a section 212(a)(9)(C)(i)((I) bar. Luckily, my client had already completed the 10 years while she was waiting for the unlawful presence bar to run. After several discussions with the family, I determined there were sufficient favorable factors to get an I-212 approval.

I worked extensively with the family to prepare their written testimonies and gather supporting documentary evidence to prove their mother regretted her past immigration violations, has good moral character, and did not pose a threat to the American community. I also counseled them on how to establish that her denial of admission would cause unusual hardships to her as well as to her family in the United States. In addition, I prepared a legal memorandum outlining the facts and procedural history, citing to the evidence, and discussing why the mother deserved the waiver based on case precedents, statutory law, and existing policies.

While the Form I-212 application remained pending, I sent a follow-up letter to the USCIS Field Office,  requesting approval and including additional evidence of the hardships the U.S. citizen son, in particular, was suffering due to his mother’s absence from the United States.

After several months had passed, the sister called to ask me whether there were any additional steps to take to get the USCIS Field Office to issue a decision.  I began to explain the various ways  (including seeking Congressional assistance) until she stopped me mid-sentence and started screaming with joy. She had just received a message from her brother stating he received the I-212 approval notice!

The mother’s follow-up interview with the U.S. Consulate occurred in April 2017, and shortly after she was issued the immigrant visa. After 13 long years of separation, she may now finally reunite with her family in the United States.

The brother and sister live in different U.S. states,  and their mother lives in a South American country. Although we communicated by telephone and email and never met in person during the course of representation, we developed a strong, trust-based relationship, which contributed to a favorable outcome. This is a true success story for Dyan Williams Law PLLC and for my client and her family.

Preparing approvable Form I-212 applications are among our main areas of expertise. Clients benefit from the advice we give in filing Form I-212 requests to lawfully re-enter the United States following a removal order or other immigration violation.

Cheers,

Dyan Williams

Founder & Principal Attorney
Dyan Williams Law PLLC
(612) 225-9900
dw@dyanwilliamslaw.com

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This article provides general information only. It is based on law, regulations and policy that are subject to change. Do not consider it as legal advice for any individual case or situation. Each legal case is different and case examples do not constitute a prediction or guarantee of success or failure in any other case. The sharing or receipt of this information does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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What Triggers a Notice of Intent to Revoke an I-130 or I-129F Petition and What Can You Do About It?

popped balloonWhen USCIS finds that it approved an I-130 (immigrant visa) or I-129F (K-1 visa) petition in error, it will issue a Notice of Intent to Revoke (NOIR) to the petitioner. A NOIR is a letter to the petitioner fully explaining why USCIS intends to revoke a previously approved petition. Typically, the petitioner has 30 days to respond to the allegations and present additional information or evidence before USCIS decides whether to revoke or reaffirm the petition approval.

What Factors Usually Trigger a Notice of Intent to Revoke? 

In marriage-based green card cases, the two most common factors that trigger a revocation notice are:

USCIS Discovers Prior Marriage Fraud Determination

A common reason for a NOIR is when USCIS overlooked a prior marriage fraud determination that prevents the approval of a subsequent petition for the same beneficiary.

Section 204(c) of the Immigration & Nationality Act states that no visa petition may be approved if the beneficiary was previously accorded, or sought to be accorded, an immediate relative or preference status as the spouse of a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, by reason of a marriage determined by USCIS to have been entered into for evading immigration laws (i.e. a sham marriage for immigration benefits).

It is not enough for the Consulate to have denied a prior immigrant visa or K-1 visa based on suspicion of a sham relationship. Rather, for section 204(c) to apply, USCIS must make an independent conclusion that the prior marriage was fraudulent.

If USCIS later discovers it should have denied the petition under section 204(c), due to an official determination of prior marriage fraud, it may issue a NOIR.

U.S Consulate Finds Lack of Evidence Showing Bona Fide Marriage

Although the U.S. Consulate has no authority to revoke a petition, it has the final say in whether to grant you an immigrant visa or K-1 visa to enter the United States. The doctrine of consular nonreviewability severely limits judicial or administrative review of a consular officer’s visa denial.

Furthermore, a consular officer who has doubts about the bona fide nature of the relationship between the petitioner and visa applicant, or observes material discrepancies in the record, may return the petition to USCIS for possible revocation.

At the immigrant visa or K-1 visa interview, the consular officer may question the visa applicant and conduct its own investigation. It may also require additional documentary evidence of the relationship, even though USCIS has already approved the petition.

If you do not communicate well, submit insufficient documents, or provide answers that cause the Consulate to doubt the bona fide nature of your relationship to the petitioner, this could lead to a NOIR citing lack of evidence to keep the petition approval. If you raise issues that conflict with the existing record, this could lead to a NOIR citing fraud or willful misrepresentation to gain immigration benefits.

Because the Consulate has no authority to re-adjudicate the petition, it must support the return of the petition with factual and concrete reasons that USCIS did not fully consider.

The Consulate should seek revocation only if the consular officer knows, or has reason to believe, that the petition approval was obtained through fraud, misrepresentation or other unlawful means, or that the visa applicant is not entitled to the benefits sought in the petition.  Generally, Consulates are instructed to not return the petition unless it discovers new information or evidence not known to USCIS at the time of approval.

What Can You Do to Avoid or Overcome a Notice of Intent to Revoke? 

In marriage-based green card cases, the documentary evidence and testimony you present is essential to getting and keeping a petition approval. You cannot obtain an immigrant visa, a K-1 visa, or adjustment to permanent resident status without an underlying petition approval.

Avoiding a Notice of Intent to Revoke starts with filing a strong petition with USCIS and preparing thoroughly for the visa interview at the U.S. Consulate. Overcoming a Notice of Intent to Revoke lies in submitting a timely and convincing response to USCIS.

The key stages to exercise caution and seek sound advice from an experienced immigration attorney are:

Filing the Petition

USCIS approves an I-130 for a spouse and an I-129F for a fiancé(e) only when it is convinced the couple more likely than not shares a bona fide relationship, i.e. a marriage or engagement based on mutual intent to establish a life together, and not just for immigration benefits.

In support of the petition, the couple may present documentary evidence such as email correspondences, telephone records, stamped passport pages, travel itineraries, hotel receipts, photos of the two of them together, and affidavits from relatives and friends demonstrating they have a bona fide relationship.

When reviewing a stand-alone I-130 or I-129F petition, USCIS does not interview the petitioner or beneficiary, or conduct independent investigation, but generally relies on the documentary evidence submitted with the petition.

USCIS will issue a Request for Evidence (RFE) if initial evidence is missing. USCIS will issue a Notice of Intent to Deny (NOID) if initial evidence is mostly present, but: (a) the filing does not appear to establish eligibility by the preponderance of the evidence; (b) the case appears to be ineligible for approval but not necessarily incurable; or (c) the adjudicator intends to rely for denial on evidence not submitted by the petitioner.

Even when USCIS approves the petition, it may later issue a Notice of Intent to Revoke at any time before the immigrant visa or adjustment of status is granted. If the petition did not contain much evidence of a bona fide relationship or eligibility for the benefit sought, it’s a lot easier for USCIS to revoke the petition approval.

Obtaining guidance from an attorney on the appropriate forms and supporting evidence to submit is essential to getting a petition approval and avoiding a NOIR.

Attending the Visa Interview

In many cases, revocation proceedings are initiated by consular officers who suspect the couple do not share a real relationship. Consular officers often rely on their opinions about the nature of a genuine relationship, in light of cultural norms, local customs, and other factors.  In turn, USCIS may depend on the findings of a consular officer who has interviewed the visa applicant, verified documentary evidence, and performed investigation abroad.

Do not take the petition approval for granted or treat the visa interview as just a formality. The doctrine of consular nonreviewability severely limits administrative or judicial review of consular decisions. The visa applicant (beneficiary of the petition) must prepare fully for the visa interview, respond consistently, truthfully and appropriately to questions, and provide any requested or missing documents.

Having counsel prepare you for the visa interview, including questions and concerns that are likely to be raised by the consular officer, is critical.

Responding to a NOIR

Even couples who share a bona fide relationship can end up with a Notice of Intent to Revoke. If USCIS issues a NOIR, it means it found good and sufficient cause to revoke the petition approval. When responding to a NOIR, it’s important to rebut each and every issue raised, including allegations against the bona fide nature of the relationship.

USCIS must provide derogatory information unknown to the petitioner or applicant in the NOIR. The petitioner typically has 30 days to respond to the allegations and present additional information or evidence before USCIS makes a decision.

Due to the time constraints, multiple issues raised in the NOIR, and the petitioner’s lack of experience with complicated immigration matters, it’s important to get counsel’s help. An experienced attorney can advise you on the rebuttal documents and information to submit, prepare a persuasive legal brief, and submit the best possible response within 30 days.

Challenging a Revocation Notice

If USCIS agrees to sustain the petition approval – following review of the response to the NOIR –  it will issue a reaffirmation notice to the petitioner. After receiving the reaffirmation notice, the Consulate may accept the petition as valid, schedule a second interview, and issue the immigrant visa or K-1 visa.

If, however, USCIS decides the petition should not have been approved, it will issue a revocation notice to the petitioner. The petitioner may appeal an I-130 or I-129F revocation to the higher agency, or file a motion to reopen or reconsider with USCIS, within 15 days. If the petitioner does not challenge the revocation, the decision becomes final and the petition may no longer be used to continue the immigration process.

When the couple is already married, the petitioner may file a new I-130 petition, but must include evidence to rebut any claims that led to the NOIR or revocation notice in a prior petition. When the couple is engaged, filing a new K-1 fiancé(e) petition is not a cure-all solution because USCIS and the Consulate will be aware of problems in the prior petition. Getting married and filing an I-130 petition is a more effective, but not foolproof, course of action.

A petitioner who files a new I-130 or I-129F petition still has to overcome issues listed in a Notice of Intent to Revoke a prior petition approval, or address concerns raised by the U.S. Consulate.

If you receive a revocation notice, consult an immigration attorney to determine whether to file an appeal, a motion to reopen or reconsider, and/or a new petition, and help you pursue your options.

To learn more about the revocation process, read our other article, Notice of Intent to Revoke I-130 or I-129F Petition: Big Stumbling Block to Overcome in Marriage-Based Green Card Case.

This article provides general information only. It is based on law, regulations and policy that are subject to change. Do not consider it as legal advice for any individual case or situation. Each legal case is different and case examples do not constitute a prediction or guarantee of success or failure in any other case. The sharing or receipt of this information does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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Notice of Intent to Revoke I-130 or I-129F Petition: Big Stumbling Block to Overcome in Marriage-Based Green Card Case

big wall

In marriage-based green card cases, USCIS’ approval of an I-130 petition does not entitle you to an immigrant visa or adjustment to permanent residence. Likewise, mere approval of an I-129F petition does not necessarily mean you will get the K-1 fiancé(e) visa. Until you are admitted to the U.S. as an immigrant or you adjust status, USCIS may revoke the approval of the petition at any time, for good and sufficient cause.

Some petitions may be automatically revoked, such as when the petitioner withdraws the petition, divorces the beneficiary, or dies and section 204(l) survivor benefits do not apply. Other petitions may be revoked on notice when USCIS determines it issued the approval in error. A Notice of Intent to Revoke (NOIR) is a big stumbling block to overcome when seeking to immigrate to the United States.

Why is the Notice of Intent to Revoke a Big Stumbling Block?  

An approved I-130 petition by a U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse allows you to apply for an immigrant visa at the U.S. Consulate or file for adjustment of status within the U.S. (if eligible). An approved I-129F petition permits you to apply for a K-1 visa to come to the U.S., marry the U.S. citizen petitioner within 90 days of arrival, and then file for a green card. Getting the petition approved is just a preliminary step.

USCIS may seek to reverse its decision and revoke the approval based on information or evidence that it did not previously consider. The information or evidence need not have been unavailable or undiscoverable at the time the petition was approved. A NOIR may be based on plain USCIS error, such as overlooking a prior marriage fraud determination or lacking information or evidence discovered by the U.S. Consulate.

Receiving a Notice of Intent to Revoke is disheartening, especially when you have already completed the visa application process and attended your visa interview. Even if the NOIR is based on misinterpretations of the facts, false allegations, or erroneous conclusions, a full and timely response is still required to keep the approval of the petition and continue with the green card process.

How Does the Revocation Process Work?

Once you are permanent resident, revocation of the petition approval is no longer possible. Instead, the U.S. government must use rescission or removal (deportation) proceedings to take your green card away.

The revocation process may begin at any time after the petition is approved, but before you adjust to permanent residence or before you are admitted to the U.S. on an immigrant visa.

When USCIS, on its own initiative,  determines it approved an I-130 or I-129F in error, it retrieves the petition from the USCIS office, consular office, or National Visa Center (NVC) for possible revocation.

In other cases, the U.S. Consulate initiates revocation by sending the case back to USCIS for further review, due to negative information it obtained during review of the visa application or during its interview of the visa applicant.  The consular officer typically denies the visa application under INA section 221(g) (temporary refusal of immigrant visa), pending USCIS’ review of the returned petition. The Consulate returns the petition to USCIS with a  memorandum explaining why it believes the petition should not have been approved or is no longer approvable.

Consulates return immigrant petitions to the National Visa Center, which then route them to the appropriate USCIS offices.

Case Status Information

When a petition is returned and relocated to USCIS, the status of the petition is logged into the national USCIS database system, which in turn updates the Case Status Online system on USCIS’ website.

Not all the USCIS service centers issue receipt notices to petitioners, informing them that the petition is now at a particular USCIS office. For many months (sometimes six months to over 12 months), petitioners often cannot obtain specific case status information through the National Customer Service Center (NCSC) or Case Status Online, until USCIS issues a decision reaffirming the approval or a Notice of Intent to Revoke.

Notice Reaffirming Approval or Notice of Intent to Revoke

Upon receipt of the returned petition, USCIS prepares the case for additional review and forwards it to the adjudications officer who will evaluate the reasons provided by the Consulate for the return.

If USCIS finds the petition is not revocable for the reasons stated by the Consulate, it will reaffirm the petition and return it to the Consulate with an explanation of its decision not to revoke the petition.

If USCIS agrees with the Consulate’s reasoning, it will issue a Notice of Intent to Revoke to the petitioner. A NOIR must be based on “good and sufficient cause.” This means there is evidence in the record, if unexplained and unrebutted, would support a denial of the petition.

A NOIR is a letter to the petitioner fully explaining why USCIS intends to revoke a previously approved petition. USCIS must provide derogatory information unknown to the petitioner or applicant in the NOIR. The petitioner has an opportunity to rebut the allegations and present additional information or evidence before USCIS makes a decision.

USCIS gives the petitioner a specific time frame (usually 30 days) to respond. Petitioners may request additional time if they need it for legitimate reasons, like obtaining documentation from abroad.

If the petitioner does not provide a full and timely explanation on why the petition should not be revoked, and support it with additional evidence, USCIS will revoke the petition. When the approval of a petition is revoked, you may no longer use it to immigrate to the United States.

Problem with K-1 Petitions

K-1 visa petitions are especially problematic because they expire after four months from the date of approval by USCIS (or date of last action by U.S. Consulate).  An expired petition may be revalidated by USCIS or the U.S. Consulate in four-month increments upon finding that the K-1 beneficiary is free to marry and intends to marry the petitioner within 90 days of arrival in the United States. The decision on whether to revalidate the petition is discretionary.

In some cases, USCIS will simply instruct the petitioner to file a new Form I-129F petition to restart the process. They might use the expiration of the previously approved Form I-129F petition as a reason to close the case, rather than decide whether to issue a reaffirmation notice or revocation notice.

What are the Steps for USCIS to Decide on a Notice of Intent to Revoke? 

USCIS will review the petitioner’s response to a NOIR before it decides whether to revoke the petition.

Reaffirmation Notice

If USCIS agrees to sustain the petition approval – following review of the response to the NOIR – it will issue a reaffirmation notice to the petitioner. It will also return the petition to the National Visa Center for transfer to the Consulate with the reaffirmation notice, a copy of the NOIR, and the petitioner’s response.

The Consulate may accept the petition as valid, schedule a second interview, and issue the immigrant visa or K-1 visa. In rare cases, however, the Consulate may return the petition again to USCIS with new evidence that was not previously considered. In that event, the revocation process begins again.

Revocation Notice

If the petitioner does not provide a satisfactory response or fails to timely respond to the NOIR, USCIS will issue a revocation notice to the petitioner.

The petitioner may appeal an I-130 or I-129F revocation to the higher agency, or file a motion to reopen or reconsider with USCIS, within 15 days. If the petitioner does not challenge the revocation, the decision becomes final and the petition may no longer be used to continue the immigration process.

Consult an Experienced Immigration Attorney from Start to Finish

An experienced immigration attorney can help you get an I-130 or I-129F approval by advising you on the appropriate forms and supporting documents to submit. Before you attend the visa interview, it’s best to have the attorney prepare you for likely questions and requests for documents, as well as potential actions by a consular officer.

If a NOIR is issued, you typically need counsel’s guidance in filing a timely, complete and satisfactory response to obtain a reaffirmation notice. If USCIS revokes the petition approval, consult an immigration attorney to determine whether to file an appeal, a motion to reopen or reconsider, and/or a new petition, and help you pursue your options.

To learn more about the revocation process, read our other article, What Triggers a Notice of Intent to Revoke an I-130 or I-129F Petition and What Can You Do About It?

This article provides general information only. It is based on law, regulations and policy that are subject to change. Do not consider it as legal advice for any individual case or situation. Each legal case is different and case examples do not constitute a prediction or guarantee of success or failure in any other case. The sharing or receipt of this information does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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Photo by: Joe Murphy