Tag Archives: adjustment of status

Adjusting to Permanent Resident Status Under INA 245(a): Bars, Exceptions and Exemptions

Section 245 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) allows certain foreign nationals who are physically present in the U.S. to adjust to permanent resident status and avoid filing for an immigrant visa at the U.S. Consulate abroad.

But unless an exception or exemption applies, you are barred from filing for INA 245(a) adjustment if you are in unlawful immigration status at the time of filing a Form I-485 [INA 245(c)(2) bar]; you have violated the conditions of your nonimmigrant status or visa [INA 245c)(2) and INA 245(c)(2)(8) bars]; and/or you failed to maintain lawful nonimmigrant status when you would otherwise be eligible for employment-based immigration [INA 245(c)(7) bar].

Statutory Bars to Adjusting Status Under INA 245(a)

The bars to INA 245(a) Adjustment of Status (AOS) include the following:

1. You Are In Unlawful Immigration Status at the Time of Filing a Form I-485 Application: INA 245(c)(2) Bar

Under INA 245(c)(2), an INA 245(a) Adjustment of Status application will be denied if at the time of the Form I-485 filing, you are not in lawful immigration status. For purposes of the INA 245(c)(2) bar, lawful status includes nonimmigrants (e.g. B1/B2 visitor, F-1 student, H-1B professional worker); refugees; asylees; parolees; and foreign nationals in Temporary Protected Status (TPS​).

You are in unlawful immigration status if you have never had lawful status (e.g. entered the U.S. without inspection and admission or parole) or ​your ​lawful status ​has ended​ (expired or was rescinded, revoked, or otherwise terminated due to violation of nonimmigrant status or other reason).

Having authorized stay is different from having lawful immigration status. The timely filing of a pending application to extend or change status (Form I-129 or Form I-539), or a pending application for adjustment (Form I-485), generally provides authorized stay, but does ​not​ provide lawful immigration status.

​A person who has a timely-filed pending Extension of Status (EOS) or Change of Status (COS) application may file a Form I-485 application after his or her nonimmigrant status expires. But if USCIS denies the EOS or COS application, you are generally considered to be in unlawful immigration status as of the expiration of your nonimmigrant status and on the date the adjustment application is filed. The INA 245(c)(2) bar would then apply, unless an exemption is available.

2. You Failed to Continuously Maintain Status and/or Violated the Terms of Your Nonimmigrant Visa: INA 245(c)(2) and INA 245(c)(8) Bars

You are not eligible to file a Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, under ​INA 245(a)​ if, other than through no fault of your own or for technical reasons,​you have ever:

Failed to continuously maintain a lawful status since entry into the United States. [You are barred from adjustment of status under INA 245(c)(2) if you are in unlawful immigration status on the date of filing the Form I-485 application.]

OR

Violated the terms of your nonimmigrant status​, such as worked without authorization. [You are barred from adjustment of status under ​INA 245(c)(8) not only if you violated the terms of your most recent nonimmigrant status, but also if you ever violated the terms of your nonimmigrant status at any time during any prior periods of stay in the U.S. as a nonimmigrant.​]

To be eligible for AOS, you only need to maintain your nonimmigrant status until you properly file a Form I-485 adjustment application with USCIS, ​so​ long as you do not engage in unauthorized employment after filing the adjustment application.​ But to protect yourself from being placed in removal proceedings if your Form I-485 is denied, you should continue to maintain your nonimmigrant status (e.g. H-1B) when possible.

When the ​INA 245(c)(2)​ and ​INA 245(c)(8) Bars May Be Excused

For purposes of ​INA 245(c)(2)​ and ​INA 245(c)(8)​, a failure to maintain lawful immigration status or violation of nonimmigrant status may be excused only for the specific period under consideration if: ​

a. The applicant was reinstated to F, M, or J status

If USCIS reinstates F or M student nonimmigrant status or if the U.S. Department of State reinstates J exchange visitor nonimmigrant status, the reinstatement only excuses the particular period of time the nonimmigrant failed to maintain status. The reinstatement does not excuse prior or future failure to maintain status.​

b. The applicant’s failure to maintain status was through no fault of his or her own or for technical reasons

The term  “other than through no fault of his or her own or for technical reasons”​ ​is limited to the following​ ​circumstances:​ 

  • Inaction of another person or organization designated by regulation to act on behalf of an applicant or over whose actions the applicant has no control, if the inaction is acknowledged by that person or organization.
  • Technical violation resulting from inaction of USCIS
  • Technical violation caused by the physical inability of the applicant to request an extension of nonimmigrant stay from USCIS in person or by mail
  • Technical violation resulting from Legacy ​Immigration and Naturalization Service (​INS​)​’s application of the 5-​year​ or 6-year period of stay for certain H-1 nurses, if the nurse was re-instated to H-1 status as a result of the Immigration Amendments of 1988.​

c. The applicant was granted an extension of nonimmigrant stay or a change of nonimmigrant status.

The immigration officer will consider all your current and previous entries into and stays in the United States, including current and previous applications for extension of stay (EOS) or change of status (COS).

If USCIS approves a timely filed EOS or COS application, or excuses and approves an untimely filed EOS or COS application, the approval is effective as of the date of the expiration of the prior nonimmigrant status. In that event, you will be considered to have maintained lawful​ status ​despite the gap in time between the expiration of the prior nonimmigrant admission and the date of the EOS or COS approval.

3. You Are an Employment-Based Applicant Who Is Not in Lawful Nonimmigrant Status: INA 245(c)(7) Bar

If you are an employment-based adjustment applicant who is not in a lawful nonimmigrant status at the time of filing your Form I-485 application, you are barred from adjusting status under INA 245(c)(7). This bar does not apply if you were in a lawful nonimmigrant status at the time of filing for adjustment, subsequently left the United States, and returned using an approved advance parole travel document while the adjustment application remains pending. ​

For purposes of this bar to adjustment, the term “lawful nonimmigrant status” includes a foreign national in a lawful status classified under the nonimmigrant statutory provisions(e.g. B1/B2 visitor, F-1 student, H-1B professional worker) and a foreign national in Temporary Protected Status (TPS).

​Lawful nonimmigrant status does not include parolees, ​asylees​, or certain other foreign nationals who are otherwise authorized to stay in the United States. ​

Exceptions and Exemptions to the Bars to Adjusting Status Under INA 245(a)

The ​INA 245(c)(2)​, ​INA 245(c)(8), and INA 245(c)(7)​ bars to adjustment do NOT apply to: ​

  • Immediate relatives of U.S. citizens [spouses, unmarried children under 21 years of age, and parents (if the U.S. citizen is 21 years of age or older)]
  • ​Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) self-petitioners/VAWA-based applicants
  • ​Certain foreign doctors/physicians and their accompanying spouse and children​
  • ​Certain G-4 international organization employees, NATO-6 employees, and their family members
  • Special immigrant juveniles
  • ​Certain members of the U.S. ​armed forces​ and their spouse​s​ and children​
  • ​Employment-based applicants in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and certain 4th preference categories who meet the ​INA 245(k) exemption. [The INA 245(k) exemption applies if your failure to maintain a lawful status, engagement in unauthorized employment, or violation of the terms of your nonimmigrant status or nonimmigrant visa lasted only for 180 days or less since your most recent lawful admission.]

​Bars to Adjustment are Different from Grounds of Inadmissibility​

Bars to adjustment should not be confused with the grounds of inadmissibility listed in INA 212.

When you are inadmissible under section 212, you may not adjust status unless you qualify for a limited exception or unless a waiver of inadmissibility is available, you qualify for it, and it is granted to you. Inadmissibility grounds include health concerns (communicable disease of public health significance), criminal activity, national security, public charge, fraud and misrepresentation of material facts to gain immigration benefits, unlawful presence, and prior removals.

Consult an Experienced Immigration Attorney

Because there are various bars and inadmissibility grounds to prevent AOS, as well as exemptions and waivers available, you need to consult an immigration attorney before you file a Form I-485 application to adjust to permanent resident status.

To learn more, read our related article, Who is Eligible (and Not Eligible) for Adjustment to Permanent Resident Status? 

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This article provides general information only. It is based on law, regulations and policy that are subject to change. Do not consider it as legal advice for any individual case or situation. Each legal case is different and case examples do not constitute a prediction or guarantee of success or failure in any other case. The sharing or receipt of this information does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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Photo by: Max Braun

 

Who is Eligible (and Not Eligible) for Adjustment to Permanent Resident Status?

When you are physically present in the U.S., your filing for Adjustment of Status (AOS) allows you to become a permanent resident without needing to apply for an immigrant visa at the U.S. Consulate abroad.

But if you are ineligible for AOS and mistakenly file a Form I-485​, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, your request will not only be denied, but you may also be placed in removal proceedings due to failure to maintain lawful nonimmigrant status and/or other grounds.

General Adjustment of Status (AOS) Eligibility Requirements

Foreign nationals may file for adjustment to permanent resident status if they meet the eligibility requirements at the time of submitting their ​Form I-485 application to USCIS.

Who is generally ELIGIBLE for AOS?

Immigrant categories that permit AOS include:

Immediate relative of a U.S. citizen [spouses, unmarried children under 21 years of age, and parents (if the U.S. citizen is 21 years of age or older)]

​Other relative of a U.S. citizen or​ relative of a lawful​ permanent resident under ​a​ family-based preference category (See U.S. Department of State’s Visa Bulletin for a  list of family-based preference categories)

​Person admitted to the United States on a K-1 visa as a f​iancé(e) of a U.S. citizen and then marries the U.S. citizen. [A K-1 visa holder who enters a valid and bona fide marriage to the U.S. citizen petitioner within 90 days of arrival in the U.S. remains eligible to adjust status on that basis, even if the marriage is legally terminated (whether by death, dissolution, or divorce) prior to adjustment of status and regardless of whether he/she remarries thereafter.]

Widow(er) of a U.S. citizen

Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) self-petitioner

​Foreign national worker under an employment-based preference category (See U.S. Department of State’s Visa Bulletin for list of employment-based preference categories)

Foreign national entrepreneur (EB5 immigrant employment-based category)

Special immigrant (includes religious workers, special immigrant juveniles, certain Afghans and Iraqis, certain U.S. armed forces members, certain physicians)

Certain victim of human trafficking  (T nonimmigrant)

Certain victim of crime (U nonimmigrant)

Person granted asylum status

Person granted refugee status

Person selected in the ​Diversity Visa lottery program ​

Beneficiary of INA 245(i) benefits

Who is generally NOT ELIGIBLE for AOS?

With limited exceptions, foreign nationals who are barred from applying for AOS include:

Foreign national ​who last entered the United States without being inspected and admitted​ or paroled by an immigration officer. [INA 245(i) and VAWA-based applicants are exempt from this bar.]

Foreign national who was issued a C-1/D-1 or D-2 visa as a nonimmigrant ​crewman and last entered the United States as a crewman in pursuit of related employment. [VAWA-based applicants are exempt from this INA 245(c)(1) bar.]

Foreign national who is now employed or has ever been employed in the United States without authorization. [ Immediate relatives of a U.S. citizen, VAWA-based applicants, and certain special immigrants are exempt from these INA 245(c)(2) and INA 245 (c)(8) bars.]

Foreign national who ​is not ​in​ lawful immigration status on the date of filing the Form I-485 application. [Immediate relatives of a U.S. citizen, VAWA-based applicants, and certain special immigrants are exempt from this INA 245(c)(2) bar.]

Foreign national​ who ​has ever ​failed to continuously maintain ​a ​lawful status​ since entry into the United States​, unless the failure ​to maintain status ​was through no fault of his or her own or for technical​ ​reasons.  [Immediate relatives of a U.S. citizen, VAWA-based applicants, and certain special immigrants are exempt from this INA 245(c)(2) bar.]

Foreign national ​who ​was last admitted to the United​ ​States​ ​in​ ​transit​ ​without​ ​a​ ​visa. [VAWA-based applicants are exempt from this INA 245(c)(3) bar.]

​Foreign national who was last ​admitted​ ​to​ ​Guam​ ​or the​ ​Commonwealth​ ​of the​ ​Northern​ ​Mariana​ ​Islands ​(CNMI) ​as a​ ​visitor​ ​under​ ​the Guam or CNMI​ ​V​isa​ ​Waiver Program​ and who is not a Canadian citizen. [Immediate relatives of a U.S. citizens are exempt from this bar.]

Foreign national ​who was last ​admitted ​to the United States as a nonimmigrant visitor without a visa under the ​Visa Waiver Program. [Immediate relatives of a U.S. citizens and VAWA-based applicants are exempt from this INA 245(c) bar.]

Foreign national ​who is​ deportable due to involvement in a terrorist activity or group. [​VAWA-based applicants are exempt from this INA 245(c)(6) bar, but may still be inadmissible for such activity.​]

​Foreign national who is seeking ​employment-based ​adjustment of status and ​who is not maintaining a lawful nonimmigrant status ​on the date of filing this ​application. [In some cases, the INA 245(k) exemption  excuses this INA 245(c)(7) bar.]

Foreign national who has ​ever ​violated​ ​the​ ​terms​ ​of the ​nonimmigrant status. [Immediate relatives of a U.S. citizen, VAWA-based applicants, and certain special immigrants are exempt from this INA 245(c)(8) bar.]

Foreign national who is a ​conditional permanent resident​. [Conditional permanent residents​ must instead file a Form I-751 petition to remove conditions on their status to obtain permanent residence unconditionally.]

Foreign national who was admitted to the U.S. on a K-1 nonimmigrant ​fiancé(e) visa, but did not marry the U.S. citizen who filed​ ​the petition or foreign national who was admitted as the K-2 ​nonimmigrant​ child of a fiancé(e)​ ​whose parent did not marry the U.S. citizen who filed​ ​the petition.​ 

INA 245(a) Adjustment of Status (AOS) Eligibility Requirements

Most applicants file for Adjustment of Status based on ​INA 245(a), which does not include all the possible ways of adjusting status, such as AOS of Refugees or Asylees under INA 209(b)​.

​​The AOS eligibility requirements under section 245(a) include:

1.  You must normally have​ been​ inspected and admitted​ ​into the United States​; or inspected and paroled into the United States.

Unless you are an INA 245(i) applicant or a V​iolence ​A​gainst ​W​omen ​A​ct (VAWA)​ applicant​, you must meet the Inspected and Admitted or Paroled Requirement before you apply for AOS under section 245(a).

To lawfully enter the United States, you must first present yourself for inspection to an immigration officer at a ​U.S.​ ​port of entry.

Admission

For lawful admission to occur, the immigration officer must authorize you to enter the U.S. in accordance with the procedures for admission.​  If, however, the admission was based on a false claim to U.S. citizenship or to U.S. nationality at the ​port of entry​, the lawful admission requirement is not met.

The most common documents showing lawful admission are:

Arrival/​Departure ​Record (Form I-94)

​Admission stamp in passport​, which may be verified using Department of Homeland Security (DHS) systems

Employment Authorization Card (Form I-688A), for special ​agricultural worker applicants, provided it was valid during the last claimed date of entry on the adjustment application

Temporary Resident Card (Form I-688), for special agricultural workers or legalization applicants granted temporary residence, provided it was valid during the​ ​last ​claimed date of entry on the ​adjustment​ application​

Border Crossing Card (Form I-586 or Form DSP-150​), provided it was valid on the date of last claimed entry.​

Plane tickets evidencing travel to the United States, or other corroborating evidence, when an Arrival/Departure Record is not required in the following situations:

  • a ​Canadian ​citizen admitted as a visitor for business, visitor for pleasure, or who was permitted to directly tr​ansit through the United States;​
  • a ​nonimmigrant residing in the British Virgin Islands who was admitted only to the U.S. Virgin Islands as a visitor for business or pleasure​;​
  • ​a Mexican ​n​ational admitted with ​a B-1/B-2 Visa and Border Crossing Card ​(Form DSP-150) ​at a land or sea ​port of entry​ as a visitor for business or pleasure ​for a period of 30 days to trave​l within 25 miles of the border;
  • a ​Mexican ​n​ational in possession of a ​Mexican diplomatic or official passport.

Waved through at port of entry

A wave through is when you present yourself for inspection, but the inspector waves you through the U.S.-Mexico or U.S-Canada land border, and allows you to enter the U.S. without asking any questions or checking your travel documents.  You must present a credible claim and submit supporting evidence, such as​ ​third party ​affidavits ​from those with personal knowledge about your wave through admission.

​Parole

In some situations, you may receive a grant of parole to enter the U.S. This is a temporary, discretionary act and is not an admission. Without determining whether you may be admitted to the U.S., the immigration officer may parole you in for deferred inspection or due to urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefits.

Parole in Place may also be issued to certain foreign nationals present without admission or parole, such as ​to a spouse, child, or parent of an ​a​ctive ​d​uty member of the U.S. ​a​rmed ​f​orces, a member in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve, or someone who previously served in the U.S. ​armed forces​ or the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve.

2. You must properly file an adjustment of status application.​

The Form I-485 must be filed with USCIS in accordance with ​the ​form ​instructions, when you are physically present in the United States. It must be signed, accompanied by the ​proper filing fee (unless a fee waiver is granted), submitted ​at the correct filing location​,  and filed when the priority date is current.

3. You must be eligible to receive an immigrant visa and an immigrant visa must be available when you file the adjustment of status application​ and at the time of final adjudication.​

Eligibility for an immigrant visa depends on the immigrant category in which you are filing for adjustment. Except for the Immediate Relative of a U.S. citizen category, the family-based and employment-based categories typically require a wait (sometimes for years or decades) before an immigrant visa becomes available.

4. You must be admissible to the United States for lawful permanent residence or eligible for a waiver of inadmissibility or other form of relief. 

You are ineligible for adjustment if you are subject to any inadmissibility grounds listed under INA 212, such as certain criminal offenses fraud or willful misrepresentation of material facts to gain immigration benefits and unlawful presence. A waiver must be available and you must qualify for the waiver if you are inadmissible to the U.S.

​5. You must merit the favorable exercise of discretion.​

The approval of a Form I-485 application under certain categories, including INA 245(a) Adjustment, is a discretionary decision.  This means you are not entitled to adjustment even when you are eligible for it.

Besides evaluating your eligibility, the immigration officer also considers other factors such as your immigration status and history;​ family unity;​ length of residence in the United States;​ business and employment; and​ community standing and moral character.​

Statutory Bars to Adjusting Status Under INA 245(a) 

Bars to adjusting status include unlawful immigration status at the time of filing a Form I-485 (INA 245(c)(2) bar); status and nonimmigrant visa violations (INA 245c)(2) and INA 245(c)(2)(8) bars); and failure to maintain lawful nonimmigrant status when you would otherwise be eligible for employment-based immigration (INA 245(c)(7) bar). There are, however, exceptions and exemptions.

Consult an Experienced Immigration Attorney

Because there are various bars and inadmissibility grounds to prevent AOS, as well as exemptions and waivers available, you need to consult an immigration attorney before you file a Form I-485 application to adjust to permanent resident status.

To learn more, read our related article, Adjusting to Permanent Resident Status Under INA 245(a): Bars, Exceptions and Exemptions.

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This article provides general information only. It is based on law, regulations and policy that are subject to change. Do not consider it as legal advice for any individual case or situation. Each legal case is different and case examples do not constitute a prediction or guarantee of success or failure in any other case. The sharing or receipt of this information does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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Photo by: Sam Howzit

 

What Triggers a Notice of Intent to Revoke an I-130 or I-129F Petition and What Can You Do About It?

popped balloonWhen USCIS finds that it approved an I-130 (immigrant visa) or I-129F (K-1 visa) petition in error, it will issue a Notice of Intent to Revoke (NOIR) to the petitioner. A NOIR is a letter to the petitioner fully explaining why USCIS intends to revoke a previously approved petition. Typically, the petitioner has 30 days to respond to the allegations and present additional information or evidence before USCIS decides whether to revoke or reaffirm the petition approval.

What Factors Usually Trigger a Notice of Intent to Revoke? 

In marriage-based green card cases, the two most common factors that trigger a revocation notice are:

USCIS Discovers Prior Marriage Fraud Determination

A common reason for a NOIR is when USCIS overlooked a prior marriage fraud determination that prevents the approval of a subsequent petition for the same beneficiary.

Section 204(c) of the Immigration & Nationality Act states that no visa petition may be approved if the beneficiary was previously accorded, or sought to be accorded, an immediate relative or preference status as the spouse of a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, by reason of a marriage determined by USCIS to have been entered into for evading immigration laws (i.e. a sham marriage for immigration benefits).

It is not enough for the Consulate to have denied a prior immigrant visa or K-1 visa based on suspicion of a sham relationship. Rather, for section 204(c) to apply, USCIS must make an independent conclusion that the prior marriage was fraudulent.

If USCIS later discovers it should have denied the petition under section 204(c), due to an official determination of prior marriage fraud, it may issue a NOIR.

U.S Consulate Finds Lack of Evidence Showing Bona Fide Marriage

Although the U.S. Consulate has no authority to revoke a petition, it has the final say in whether to grant you an immigrant visa or K-1 visa to enter the United States. The doctrine of consular nonreviewability severely limits judicial or administrative review of a consular officer’s visa denial.

Furthermore, a consular officer who has doubts about the bona fide nature of the relationship between the petitioner and visa applicant, or observes material discrepancies in the record, may return the petition to USCIS for possible revocation.

At the immigrant visa or K-1 visa interview, the consular officer may question the visa applicant and conduct its own investigation. It may also require additional documentary evidence of the relationship, even though USCIS has already approved the petition.

If you do not communicate well, submit insufficient documents, or provide answers that cause the Consulate to doubt the bona fide nature of your relationship to the petitioner, this could lead to a NOIR citing lack of evidence to keep the petition approval. If you raise issues that conflict with the existing record, this could lead to a NOIR citing fraud or willful misrepresentation to gain immigration benefits.

Because the Consulate has no authority to re-adjudicate the petition, it must support the return of the petition with factual and concrete reasons that USCIS did not fully consider.

The Consulate should seek revocation only if the consular officer knows, or has reason to believe, that the petition approval was obtained through fraud, misrepresentation or other unlawful means, or that the visa applicant is not entitled to the benefits sought in the petition.  Generally, Consulates are instructed to not return the petition unless it discovers new information or evidence not known to USCIS at the time of approval.

What Can You Do to Avoid or Overcome a Notice of Intent to Revoke? 

In marriage-based green card cases, the documentary evidence and testimony you present is essential to getting and keeping a petition approval. You cannot obtain an immigrant visa, a K-1 visa, or adjustment to permanent resident status without an underlying petition approval.

Avoiding a Notice of Intent to Revoke starts with filing a strong petition with USCIS and preparing thoroughly for the visa interview at the U.S. Consulate. Overcoming a Notice of Intent to Revoke lies in submitting a timely and convincing response to USCIS.

The key stages to exercise caution and seek sound advice from an experienced immigration attorney are:

Filing the Petition

USCIS approves an I-130 for a spouse and an I-129F for a fiancé(e) only when it is convinced the couple more likely than not shares a bona fide relationship, i.e. a marriage or engagement based on mutual intent to establish a life together, and not just for immigration benefits.

In support of the petition, the couple may present documentary evidence such as email correspondences, telephone records, stamped passport pages, travel itineraries, hotel receipts, photos of the two of them together, and affidavits from relatives and friends demonstrating they have a bona fide relationship.

When reviewing a stand-alone I-130 or I-129F petition, USCIS does not interview the petitioner or beneficiary, or conduct independent investigation, but generally relies on the documentary evidence submitted with the petition.

USCIS will issue a Request for Evidence (RFE) if initial evidence is missing. USCIS will issue a Notice of Intent to Deny (NOID) if initial evidence is mostly present, but: (a) the filing does not appear to establish eligibility by the preponderance of the evidence; (b) the case appears to be ineligible for approval but not necessarily incurable; or (c) the adjudicator intends to rely for denial on evidence not submitted by the petitioner.

Even when USCIS approves the petition, it may later issue a Notice of Intent to Revoke at any time before the immigrant visa or adjustment of status is granted. If the petition did not contain much evidence of a bona fide relationship or eligibility for the benefit sought, it’s a lot easier for USCIS to revoke the petition approval.

Obtaining guidance from an attorney on the appropriate forms and supporting evidence to submit is essential to getting a petition approval and avoiding a NOIR.

Attending the Visa Interview

In many cases, revocation proceedings are initiated by consular officers who suspect the couple do not share a real relationship. Consular officers often rely on their opinions about the nature of a genuine relationship, in light of cultural norms, local customs, and other factors.  In turn, USCIS may depend on the findings of a consular officer who has interviewed the visa applicant, verified documentary evidence, and performed investigation abroad.

Do not take the petition approval for granted or treat the visa interview as just a formality. The doctrine of consular nonreviewability severely limits administrative or judicial review of consular decisions. The visa applicant (beneficiary of the petition) must prepare fully for the visa interview, respond consistently, truthfully and appropriately to questions, and provide any requested or missing documents.

Having counsel prepare you for the visa interview, including questions and concerns that are likely to be raised by the consular officer, is critical.

Responding to a NOIR

Even couples who share a bona fide relationship can end up with a Notice of Intent to Revoke. If USCIS issues a NOIR, it means it found good and sufficient cause to revoke the petition approval. When responding to a NOIR, it’s important to rebut each and every issue raised, including allegations against the bona fide nature of the relationship.

USCIS must provide derogatory information unknown to the petitioner or applicant in the NOIR. The petitioner typically has 30 days to respond to the allegations and present additional information or evidence before USCIS makes a decision.

Due to the time constraints, multiple issues raised in the NOIR, and the petitioner’s lack of experience with complicated immigration matters, it’s important to get counsel’s help. An experienced attorney can advise you on the rebuttal documents and information to submit, prepare a persuasive legal brief, and submit the best possible response within 30 days.

Challenging a Revocation Notice

If USCIS agrees to sustain the petition approval – following review of the response to the NOIR –  it will issue a reaffirmation notice to the petitioner. After receiving the reaffirmation notice, the Consulate may accept the petition as valid, schedule a second interview, and issue the immigrant visa or K-1 visa.

If, however, USCIS decides the petition should not have been approved, it will issue a revocation notice to the petitioner. The petitioner may appeal an I-130 or I-129F revocation to the higher agency, or file a motion to reopen or reconsider with USCIS, within 15 days. If the petitioner does not challenge the revocation, the decision becomes final and the petition may no longer be used to continue the immigration process.

When the couple is already married, the petitioner may file a new I-130 petition, but must include evidence to rebut any claims that led to the NOIR or revocation notice in a prior petition. When the couple is engaged, filing a new K-1 fiancé(e) petition is not a cure-all solution because USCIS and the Consulate will be aware of problems in the prior petition. Getting married and filing an I-130 petition is a more effective, but not foolproof, course of action.

A petitioner who files a new I-130 or I-129F petition still has to overcome issues listed in a Notice of Intent to Revoke a prior petition approval, or address concerns raised by the U.S. Consulate.

If you receive a revocation notice, consult an immigration attorney to determine whether to file an appeal, a motion to reopen or reconsider, and/or a new petition, and help you pursue your options.

To learn more about the revocation process, read our other article, Notice of Intent to Revoke I-130 or I-129F Petition: Big Stumbling Block to Overcome in Marriage-Based Green Card Case.

This article provides general information only. It is based on law, regulations and policy that are subject to change. Do not consider it as legal advice for any individual case or situation. Each legal case is different and case examples do not constitute a prediction or guarantee of success or failure in any other case. The sharing or receipt of this information does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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Photo by: Quinn Dombrowski

Notice of Intent to Revoke I-130 or I-129F Petition: Big Stumbling Block to Overcome in Marriage-Based Green Card Case

big wall

In marriage-based green card cases, USCIS’ approval of an I-130 petition does not entitle you to an immigrant visa or adjustment to permanent residence. Likewise, mere approval of an I-129F petition does not necessarily mean you will get the K-1 fiancé(e) visa. Until you are admitted to the U.S. as an immigrant or you adjust status, USCIS may revoke the approval of the petition at any time, for good and sufficient cause.

Some petitions may be automatically revoked, such as when the petitioner withdraws the petition, divorces the beneficiary, or dies and section 204(l) survivor benefits do not apply. Other petitions may be revoked on notice when USCIS determines it issued the approval in error. A Notice of Intent to Revoke (NOIR) is a big stumbling block to overcome when seeking to immigrate to the United States.

Why is the Notice of Intent to Revoke a Big Stumbling Block?  

An approved I-130 petition by a U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse allows you to apply for an immigrant visa at the U.S. Consulate or file for adjustment of status within the U.S. (if eligible). An approved I-129F petition permits you to apply for a K-1 visa to come to the U.S., marry the U.S. citizen petitioner within 90 days of arrival, and then file for a green card. Getting the petition approved is just a preliminary step.

USCIS may seek to reverse its decision and revoke the approval based on information or evidence that it did not previously consider. The information or evidence need not have been unavailable or undiscoverable at the time the petition was approved. A NOIR may be based on plain USCIS error, such as overlooking a prior marriage fraud determination or lacking information or evidence discovered by the U.S. Consulate.

Receiving a Notice of Intent to Revoke is disheartening, especially when you have already completed the visa application process and attended your visa interview. Even if the NOIR is based on misinterpretations of the facts, false allegations, or erroneous conclusions, a full and timely response is still required to keep the approval of the petition and continue with the green card process.

How Does the Revocation Process Work?

Once you are permanent resident, revocation of the petition approval is no longer possible. Instead, the U.S. government must use rescission or removal (deportation) proceedings to take your green card away.

The revocation process may begin at any time after the petition is approved, but before you adjust to permanent residence or before you are admitted to the U.S. on an immigrant visa.

When USCIS, on its own initiative,  determines it approved an I-130 or I-129F in error, it retrieves the petition from the USCIS office, consular office, or National Visa Center (NVC) for possible revocation.

In other cases, the U.S. Consulate initiates revocation by sending the case back to USCIS for further review, due to negative information it obtained during review of the visa application or during its interview of the visa applicant.  The consular officer typically denies the visa application under INA section 221(g) (temporary refusal of immigrant visa), pending USCIS’ review of the returned petition. The Consulate returns the petition to USCIS with a  memorandum explaining why it believes the petition should not have been approved or is no longer approvable.

Consulates return immigrant petitions to the National Visa Center, which then route them to the appropriate USCIS offices.

Case Status Information

When a petition is returned and relocated to USCIS, the status of the petition is logged into the national USCIS database system, which in turn updates the Case Status Online system on USCIS’ website.

Not all the USCIS service centers issue receipt notices to petitioners, informing them that the petition is now at a particular USCIS office. For many months (sometimes six months to over 12 months), petitioners often cannot obtain specific case status information through the National Customer Service Center (NCSC) or Case Status Online, until USCIS issues a decision reaffirming the approval or a Notice of Intent to Revoke.

Notice Reaffirming Approval or Notice of Intent to Revoke

Upon receipt of the returned petition, USCIS prepares the case for additional review and forwards it to the adjudications officer who will evaluate the reasons provided by the Consulate for the return.

If USCIS finds the petition is not revocable for the reasons stated by the Consulate, it will reaffirm the petition and return it to the Consulate with an explanation of its decision not to revoke the petition.

If USCIS agrees with the Consulate’s reasoning, it will issue a Notice of Intent to Revoke to the petitioner. A NOIR must be based on “good and sufficient cause.” This means there is evidence in the record, if unexplained and unrebutted, would support a denial of the petition.

A NOIR is a letter to the petitioner fully explaining why USCIS intends to revoke a previously approved petition. USCIS must provide derogatory information unknown to the petitioner or applicant in the NOIR. The petitioner has an opportunity to rebut the allegations and present additional information or evidence before USCIS makes a decision.

USCIS gives the petitioner a specific time frame (usually 30 days) to respond. Petitioners may request additional time if they need it for legitimate reasons, like obtaining documentation from abroad.

If the petitioner does not provide a full and timely explanation on why the petition should not be revoked, and support it with additional evidence, USCIS will revoke the petition. When the approval of a petition is revoked, you may no longer use it to immigrate to the United States.

K-1 visa petitions are especially problematic because they expire after four months from the date of approval by USCIS (or date of last action by U.S. Consulate).  An expired petition may be revalidated by USCIS or the U.S. Consulate in four-month increments upon finding that the K-1 beneficiary is free to marry and intends to marry the petitioner within 90 days of arrival in the United States. The decision on whether to revalidate the petition is discretionary.

What are the Steps for USCIS to Decide on a Notice of Intent to Revoke? 

USCIS will review the petitioner’s response to a NOIR before it decides whether to revoke the petition.

Reaffirmation Notice

If USCIS agrees to sustain the petition approval – following review of the response to the NOIR – it will issue a reaffirmation notice to the petitioner. It will also return the petition to the National Visa Center for transfer to the Consulate with the reaffirmation notice, a copy of the NOIR, and the petitioner’s response.

The Consulate may accept the petition as valid, schedule a second interview, and issue the immigrant visa or K-1 visa. In rare cases, however, the Consulate may return the petition again to USCIS with new evidence that was not previously considered. In that event, the revocation process begins again.

Revocation Notice

If the petitioner does not provide a satisfactory response or fails to timely respond to the NOIR, USCIS will issue a revocation notice to the petitioner.

The petitioner may appeal an I-130 or I-129F revocation to the higher agency, or file a motion to reopen or reconsider with USCIS, within 15 days. If the petitioner does not challenge the revocation, the decision becomes final and the petition may no longer be used to continue the immigration process.

Consult an Experienced Immigration Attorney from Start to Finish

An experienced immigration attorney can help you get an I-130 or I-129F approval by advising you on the appropriate forms and supporting documents to submit. Before you attend the visa interview, it’s best to have the attorney prepare you for likely questions and requests for documents, as well as potential actions by a consular officer.

If a NOIR is issued, you typically need counsel’s guidance in filing a timely, complete and satisfactory response to obtain a reaffirmation notice. If USCIS revokes the petition approval, consult an immigration attorney to determine whether to file an appeal, a motion to reopen or reconsider, and/or a new petition, and help you pursue your options.

To learn more about the revocation process, read our other article, What Triggers a Notice of Intent to Revoke an I-130 or I-129F Petition and What Can You Do About It?

This article provides general information only. It is based on law, regulations and policy that are subject to change. Do not consider it as legal advice for any individual case or situation. Each legal case is different and case examples do not constitute a prediction or guarantee of success or failure in any other case. The sharing or receipt of this information does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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Form I-864: Alternatives to Meeting the Financial Requirement for Permanent Residence and Avoiding a Public Charge Determination

The Form I-864, Affidavit of Support, is key to meeting the financial requirement for permanent residence and avoiding a public charge determination in most family-based and some employment-based immigrant visa or adjustment cases. Failure to meet the I-864 requirements may cause the U.S. Consulate or USCIS to determine you will likely become a “public charge,” i.e. become primarily dependent on the U.S. government for subsistence. This ground of inadmissibility bars you from receiving an immigrant visa or green card.

The petitioner who filed the immigrant petition on your behalf must also be your sponsor who files a Form I-864 to support your immigrant visa or adjustment application. When the petitioner does not earn enough income to sponsor you, there are alternatives to meeting the financial requirement.

What income requirement must the sponsor meet? 

To qualify as a sponsor, most petitioners must show their current annual household income is at least 125% of the federal poverty level for their household size.

Sponsors who are on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces, including the Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force, or Coast Guard, and are sponsoring a spouse or minor child, only need to earn an income of 100% of the federal poverty level for their household size. (This exception does not apply to joint or substitute sponsors).

The federal poverty level, per household size, is set once a year and is shown in the Form I-864, Poverty Guidelines.

The household size includes:

  • the sponsor
  • the sponsor’s spouse (even if they are separated or live separately)
  • the sponsor’s unmarried children under 21 (regardless of where they live)
  • any person listed as a dependent on the sponsor’s last tax return
  • the intending (sponsored) immigrant
  • any derivative beneficiaries (i.e. those without a separate I-130 petition being filed on their behalf) who are accompanying the principal beneficiary (i.e. immigrating at the same time or within six months of the principal immigrant)
  • any immigrants previously sponsored with Form I-864 (or Form I-864 EZ), Affidavit of Support.

What are the alternatives if the sponsor does not earn enough income? 

There are situations in which the petitioner does not earn enough income to sponsor the immigrant. Examples include retired U.S. citizen parents,  U.S. citizen spouses who are still attending school and do not work full time, and petitioners with large household sizes.

When the petitioner does not qualify financially as a sponsor, there are other ways to meet the financial requirement for permanent residence and avoid a public charge determination.

1. The Sponsor May Get a Joint Sponsor to File a Separate Form I-864

A joint sponsor may submit a separate Form I-864, Affidavit of Support, when the sponsor does not earn sufficient income. A joint sponsor does not have to be related to the sponsor or the intending immigrant. But like the sponsor, the joint sponsor must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen or national or a permanent resident.
  • Be at least 18 years old.
  • Be domiciled (live) in the United States or a territory or possession.  (If they live abroad, they may show their residence abroad is temporary and they still have a domicile in the U.S. or will establish a domicile in the U.S. on or before the date of the principal intending immigrant’s admission or adjustment of status).
  • Meet all of the financial requirements.

Joint sponsors must meet the income threshold for their household size, independently. They cannot combine their income with the sponsor’s or another joint sponsor’s income to satisfy the requirement.

Intending immigrants are allowed only one joint sponsor. In family-based preference category cases including a principal beneficiary and at least one accompanying derivative beneficiary, the sponsor may use up to two joint sponsors.

2. The Sponsor May Use the Intending Immigrant’s Income to Overcome the Income Shortage (in Limited Cases)

The sponsor may include the income from the intending immigrant, if that income will continue from the same source after immigration. The intending immigrant must also currently reside with the sponsor, unless he or she is sponsor’s spouse.

The sponsored immigrant whose income is being used to meet the income requirement does not need to submit a Form I-864A, Contract Between Sponsor and Household Member, unless a spouse and/or children is immigrating with the sponsored immigrant. In this instance, the I-864A relates to support for the spouse and/or children.

3. The Sponsor May Include Income from Certain Relatives or Dependents

Sponsors may include income from U.S. citizen or permanent resident relatives (spouse, adult child, parent, or sibling) living in their household, or U.S. citizen or permanent resident dependents claimed in their most recent federal income tax return (regardless of where they live). The relative or dependent must also earn income that meets the federal poverty level for their household size.

The relative or dependent must submit a Form I-864A, Contract Between Sponsor and Household Member, agreeing to be jointly responsible for the sponsored immigrant. They must also be at least 18 years old when they sign the I-864A.

4. The Sponsor May Supplement Income With Assets

To supplement income, the sponsor may use the value of assets that can be converted into cash within one year and without considerable hardship or financial loss to the owner. Examples are money in a bank account, stocks or bonds, the net value of a second automobile, and the net value of a home or other real estate.

The assets used must be owned by (1) the sponsor, (2) the sponsor’s U.S. citizen or permanent resident relative (spouse, adult child, parent, or sibling) who resides with the sponsor and submits a Form I-864A , Contract Between Sponsor and Household Member, or (3) the intending immigrant (regardless of where he or she lives).

The value of the assets must be at least five times the difference between the sponsor’s total household income and the current federal poverty guideline for his or her household size. The exception is when a U.S.  citizen is sponsoring a spouse or minor child.  In that case, the assets must total at least three times the difference.

The sponsor must include evidence of the value of the assets used, such as a bank account record showing the  money has been on deposit for the last 12 months, and real estate appraisals with evidence of the sum of all loans secured by a mortgage, trust deed, or any other lien on the property.

USCIS or the NVC May Issue a Request for Evidence on the I-864 Requirement

U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS), which adjudicates I-485, adjustment to permanent residence applications, may issue a Request for Evidence when it determines the I-864 is deficient. Currently, the National Benefits Center (NBC) — usually through contract employees – do the initial screening of the I-864 based on a checklist.

The National Visa Center (NVC), which processes immigrant visa applications before they are forwarded to the U.S. Consulate abroad, may also issue RFEs concerning the I-864.

When an RFE is issued, USCIS and the NVC stops processing the case. Interim benefits, such as employment authorization and advance parole for I-485 applicants, are also delayed until an RFE response is submitted.

If the NBC determines  the response is inadequate, it will not forward the case to the USCIS Field Office for adjudication and will deny the I-485 due to failure to provide an adequate response. Similarly, the NVC may refuse to forward the immigrant visa case to the U.S. Consulate if it determines the RFE response is insufficient.

At the adjustment interview, USCIS may ask for current evidence that the financial requirement is met. The U.S. Consulate may also ask for additional financial evidence at the immigrant visa interview.  Nevertheless, the proper submission of required forms and documents and timely, full responses to RFEs permit the case to move forward.

Can an RFE Be Issued in Error? 

RFEs are issued for a variety of legitimate reasons, such as lack of evidence of the sponsor’s current income, missing federal tax return and W2s for the most recent tax year, and mistakes in filling out the I-864. But some RFEs are issued in error, such as when USCIS or the NVC overlooks evidence that the income requirement is met.

An RFE can be issued in error when the sponsor’s Current Individual Annual Income  meets the income requirement, but the total income for the most recent tax year is less than the federal poverty level for the household size. Such RFEs ask for evidence of assets or a separate I-864 from a joint sponsor to overcome the perceived income shortage.

The regulations and USCIS policy, however, state that the sponsor’s current annual income – not income on the federal tax return for the most recent tax year – is what really counts. Current income refers to the total earnings the sponsor expects to earn from the start to the end of the calendar year.  Income includes both taxable and nontaxable income, such as certain federal or state benefits (e.g. social security retirement or disability), as well as unemployment or workers compensation.

The sponsor should submit evidence of current income (e.g. pay statements for the last six months and current letter of employment), even though this is not required initial evidence.

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For more information, read our related article, Form I-864: Key to Meeting the Financial Requirements for Permanent Residence and Avoiding a Public Charge Determination.

Consult an immigration attorney to help you meet the financial requirements for permanent residence and avoid a public charge determination. The best time to speak with an attorney is before you file for the immigrant visa or for adjustment, not after you receive an RFE.

A good attorney can evaluate whether the sponsor meets the income requirements and, if he or she does not, recommend alternatives to make up for the shortfall.

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This article provides general information only. It is based on law, regulations and policy that are subject to change. Do not consider it as legal advice for any individual case or situation. Each legal case is different and case examples do not constitute a prediction or guarantee of success or failure in any other case. The sharing or receipt of this information does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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Photo by: TaxCredits.net